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James Buchanan 'Diamond Jim Brady', a BPH sufferer, bestowed the gift that helped found the James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute at Johns Hopkins. Photo courtesy of James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute.

in normal men would shrink their prostates. Other approaches proved more promising. In September 1891, Southern Pacific Railroad physician George Goodfellow, of Tucson, Arizona, removed prostate tissue through an incision made in the perineum—the area between the scrotum and rectum. While this procedure isn't documented, Goodfellow has been credited with the first perineal prostatectomy. New York City's Eugene Fuller originated the suprapubic procedure—where the prostate is removed through an incision made through the lower abdomen and bladder. Nearly a century after reporting six successful cases, he was memorialized with the AUA's Eugene Fuller Award in 1985.

Hugh Hampton Young, a urologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital accumulated even better results. He used a perineal incision to remove the prostatic mass, but he also pushed the gland upward from the rectum to ease and complete the excision, thus distinguishing his approach and making the removal more complete. This innovative maneuver was one of many by Young, who came to be known as the "Father of American Urology."

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